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Event Details

90. 12th Annual Best Practice Symposium

4/27/2018, 8:30 AM Registration / 9:00 AM - 4:55 PM Presentation

 FREE 

The CARES Institute

Takes Pleasure in Announcing:

David Finkelhor, PhD,
Jane F. Silovsky, PhD, Benjamin Sigel, PhD, and Amanda Mitten, MA

12th Annual Best Practice Symposium

Intended audiences: This presentation is intended for mental health professionals (including psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and licensed counselors), child protection workers, law enforcement personnel, attorneys, physicians, nurses, and all other disciplines not listed. Space is limited. No cost to attend.

This presentation has been made possible by continued support from
Wakefern Foundation.
shoprite

Agenda:

9:00 am
10:30 am
10:35 am

12:00pm
1:00 pm

2:15 pm

3:30 pm
3:35 pm
4:55pm
News to Use: Distilling the Useful Knowledge from the News about Child Maltreatment
Break
Poly-victimization and Developmental Victimology: a New Way of Thinking about Child Maltreatment
Lunch
Sexual Development in Children - What is Typical, Concerning, or Problematic? And Dispelling the Myths of Children with Problematic Sexual Behavior (PSB)
Placement Decisions, Safety Planning, and Sibling Reunification in Cases of Children with Problematic Sexual Behavior
Break
Community Identification and Response to Sexual Behavior of Youth: Promising Efforts
End of Presentation

  • News to Use: Distilling the Useful Knowledge from the News about Child Maltreatment by David Finkelhor, PhD

  • Program Description:

    This presentation will touch on a variety of trendy topics from the news and recent literature about child maltreatment with an eye for what is really useful for our practice and policy. The topics will include: Internet Crimes against Children, Adverse Childhood Experiences, Neurobiology of Trauma, Abuse in Sport and Youth-Serving Organizations, and Sex Trafficking. The key message is the importance of staying focused on basic knowledge and evidence-based practice, grounded in good epidemiology and strong theory about behavioral and social change.

    Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to:

    1. summarize the diversity of child maltreatment and sexual abuse.
    2. describe key oversimplifications present in media and some current training
    3. comment about the research basis with regard to a number of key problems
    4. discover important enduring accomplishments of the field.
  • Poly-victimization and Developmental Victimology: a New Way of Thinking about Child Maltreatment by David Finkelhor, PhD

  • Program Description:

    This presentation introduces the concepts of polyvictimization and developmental victimology, discusses its scope and utility in understanding the impact of abuse, and suggests its implications for prevention and intervention. A core element of the concept is that for many children victimization may be better thought of as a condition rather than an event. This session will address current problems in child victimization conceptualization, comprehensive assessment of victimization, polyvictimization, research findings, pathways to the polyvictimization condition, and implications for practice.

    Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to:

    1. define and utilize the concept of poly-victimization.
    2. summarize the various pathways by which youth come to be poly-victim
    3. interpret the concept of "developmental victimology” and how it integrates the field of child maltreatment and can lead to better policy and practice
    David Finkelhor, PhD is Director of Crimes against Children Research Center, Professor of Sociology, and University Professor at the University of New Hampshire. His core areas of interest have been in child maltreatment and family violence, dating back in 1977. He is perhaps best known for his conceptual and empirical work on the problem of child sexual abuse, including prevalence surveys, his Four Pre-conditions Model of Sexual Abuse, and his Four Traumagenic Dynamics Model of sexual abuse trauma. He also helped develop the concept of "poly-victimization.” In addition, he has done extensive research about child homicide, missing and abducted children, bullying, and Internet victimization. In his recent work, for example, his book, Child Victimization (Oxford University Press, 2008), he has tried to unify and integrate knowledge about all the diverse forms of child victimization in a field he has termed Developmental Victimology. This book received the Daniel Schneider Child Welfare Book of the Year award in 2009. He has also written extensively about trends in child maltreatment. Altogether he is editor and author of 12 books and over 200 journal articles and book chapters. He has received grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, and the US Department of Justice, and a variety of other sources. In 1994, he was given the Distinguished Child Abuse Professional Award by the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, in 2004 he was given the Significant Achievement Award from the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers, in 2005 he and his colleagues received the Child Maltreatment Article of the Year award, in 2007 he was elected as a Fellow of the American Society of Criminology, and in 2014 he was awarded the National Scientific Impact Award from the Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect.

  • Sexual Development in Children – What is Typical, Concerning, or Problematic? And Dispelling the Myths of Children with PSB by Jane F. Silovsky, PhD, Benjamin Sigel, PhD, Amanda Mitten, M.A.

  • Program Description:

    Sexual development is part of typical childhood development. However, sometimes the sexual behaviors of children are more than a result of harmless curiosity. In fact, more than one-third of sexual offenses against children are committed by other youth. Further, problematic sexual behavior (PSB) occurs among children who know each other, often family members. Families are often bereft of guidance on what to do when PSB occur within the family to address safety and the treatment needs of all the children. Professionals across systems are also mired in misconceptions. Subsequently, the needs of the family members are not adequately addressed leading to multiple pathways of problems. While evidence-based practices (EBP) exist to address PSB and to address trauma symptoms, most communities either do not have access to or are faced with many challenges to implement EBP to best provide comprehensive services to families. This presentation will provide an overview of sexual development in children, problematic sexual behavior of youth, misconceptions about the children, and evidence-based treatments to address PSB in children.

    Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to:

    1. explain childhood typical sexual development, problematic sexual behavior, and guidelines evaluate the behavior.
    2. explain risk and protective factors associated with the development of problematic sexual behavior in children
    3. summarize evidence that counter common misconceptions about children with problematic sexual behavior
    4. able to identify research supported components of treatment for youth with problematic sexual behavior.

  • Placement Decisions, Safety Planning, and Sibling Reunification in Cases of Children with Problematic Sexual Behavior by Jane F. Silovsky, PhD, Benjamin Sigel, PhD, Amanda Mitten, M.A.

  • Program Description:

    Children with problematic sexual behavior (PSB) are defined as youth ages 12 and younger who engage in behaviors involving sexual body parts (i.e., genitals, anus, buttocks, or breasts) that are developmentally inappropriate or potentially harmful to themselves (Chaffin et al., 2008). PSB most commonly occurs among children within the same family. There are multiple effects PSB may have on a family. For example, caregiver stress, an increased risk of placement disruptions, and an increased risk for emotional and behavioral problems for both the child demonstrating PSB and the recipient child. Although children who have problematic sexual behavior sometimes require a restrictive or out-of-home placement, most children with this behavior can remain in their home, even if other children reside with them. In decision making around placement and reunification, a caregiver′s role plays an integral piece in this process. This role will be discussed further, as well as topics around supervision, rules and boundaries in the home, assessment, and open communication around sexual behavior. This presentation is designed for professionals from a variety of disciplines (social work, law enforcement, mental health), and will address safety planning and placement decisions in cases where children have problematic sexual behavior. Planning for sibling reunification will also be addressed. This may include, but will not be limited to treatment for the recipient child, visitation planning, and details surrounding the reunification process and decision making.

    Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to:

    1. summarize factors that impact placement decisions for children who have problematic sexual behavior.
    2. apply components of safety plans for children with problematic sexual behavior and how to address safety planning with families.
    3. choose strategies to enhance successful reunification of siblings.
    4. explain characteristics of home environments that promote safety and protective factors.
  • Community Identification and Response to Sexual Behavior of Youth: Promising Efforts by Jane F. Silovsky, PhD, Benjamin Sigel, PhD, Amanda Mitten, M.A.

  • Program Description:

    Early intervention efforts directed toward youth with problematic sexual behavior (PSB) has strong promise for the prevention of child sexual abuse (CSA). To this end, understanding the complexities of how PSB of children is identified in the community is a key initial step. Given the scientific evidence supporting short-term and long-term efficacy of community-based treatment for youth with PSB and for children′s trauma symptoms, concentrated efforts to overcome the barriers to implementation of these services is warranted. Community efforts are underway across the country to improve community response utilizing multidisciplinary teams as a hub for leadership and partnerships. This workshop will address strategies to address sexual behavior of youth in the community using a collaborative approach. Examples from across the country will be provided. The workshop will end with an activity to facilitate local community assessment and strategizing next steps for collaborative multi-agency efforts to address problematic sexual behavior of youth in the community.

    Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to:

    1. use identification of sexual behavior of children for early identification efforts.
    2. examine the community barriers to the implementation of evidence-based treatments for children with problematic sexual behaviors.
    3. compare the inner agency and outer context factors that impact implementation of evidence base services consistent with Aarons et al. (2011) Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) model.
    4. discover efforts across the country to improve multidisciplinary efforts to identify, prevent, respond, and implement interventions for children with problematic sexual behavior.
    5. organize with others to identify important next steps to improve the identification, outreach education, and response to problematic sexual behavior of children in the community

    Jane F. Silovsky, PhD Professor, is a clinical child psychologist and the Associate Director of the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. Dr. Silovsky received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Alabama. Currently, she is a Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Since 1997, she has been the Director of the Children with Problematic Sexual Behavior program, an assessment, treatment, and research program for preschool and school-age children with problematic sexual behavior. Further, Dr. Silovsky is the director of the National Center on the Sexual Behavior of Youth which provides training and technical assistance to communities addressing problematic sexual behavior of youth, the child victims, and the caregivers. Her research is in problematic sexual behavior of youth, and treatment outcome and program evaluation of services for children affected by child maltreatment.

    Benjamin Sigel, PhD,is a Licensed Psychologist and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS). Dr. Sigel earned his doctorate in clinical psychology from Oklahoma State University and completed his internship and postdoctoral fellowship at UAMS. His areas of expertise include assessment and treatment of children with a history of experiencing trauma and exhibiting problematic sexual behavior. Dr. Sigel is a Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) trainer as well as a trainer for the National Center on the Sexual Behavior of Youth. He is prominently involved in the UAMS AR BEST (Arkansas Building Effective Services for Trauma) programs which have disseminated evidence-based treatment for trauma across Arkansas. Finally, Dr. Sigel is the Director of the UAMS Child Study Center Traumatic Stress Clinic.
    Further, he provides national training and consultation in the PSB-CBT school age model, assists with the initial assessment of needs and design a training plan to facilitate teams′ use of the evidence-based program, collaborative care, and engagement of stakeholders.

    Amanda Mitten, M.A.is a Licensed Professional Counselor at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. Ms. Mitten received her Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology from the University of Central Oklahoma in 2014. Her clinical experiences include evidence-based interventions for children with disruptive behavior disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder and other trauma-related disorders, children with problematic sexual behavior, and assessment of children prenatally exposed to drugs and alcohol. Ms. Mitten also serves as the program coordinator for CCAN′s Child Trauma Services Program (CTSP)

    Requesting Assistance: If you require assistance with hearing, vision or mobility to make this conference accessible to you, please contact the office at (856) 566-6744 three (3) weeks prior to the conference.

    Accredidation:

    Social Workers: This course is approved by the Association of Social Work Boards - ASWB NJ CE Course Approval Program Provider #125 Course #1847 from 04/19/2018 to 04/19/2020. Social workers will receive the following type and number of credit(s): Clinical Social Work Practice 6.75.

    Course Completion: Certificates will be immediately handed to participants who attend the entire session And complete a course evaluation.

    Attorneys: This course has been approved by the Supreme Court of New Jersey Board on Continuing Legal Education for 8.10 general credits.

    Physicians: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Medical Society of New Jersey through the joint providership of Atlantic Health System and the American Academy of Pediatrics, New Jersey Chapter. Atlantic Health System is accredited by the Medical Society of New Jersey to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement: Atlantic Health System designates this live activity for a maximum of 6.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Nurses: Cooper University Hospital is an approved provider of continuing nursing education by the New Jersey State Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center′s Commission on Accreditation. Successful completion of the program requires attendance for the full session and completion of an evaluation form. This activity provides 6.67 contact hour(s).

    Location:

    The Professional Center at DCF
    30 Van Dyke Ave
    New Brunswick, NJ 08901

    Directions: link

    For More Information, Contact: (856) 566-6744 or carestraining@rowan.edu

    Status: Sold Out

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